Online General Education Courses

Summer Session 2022

Summer 2022 Online General Education Courses

 

UConn’s Summer Sessions offers many fully online general education course requirements to help you get ahead, save money, or catch-up. Online GenEd classes are taught by UConn instructors and are delivered within an asynchronous format. You can participate at any time of day from nearly anywhere.

If you are a student from another school, you can take UConn summer classes online and transfer them to your home institution (you should check with your home institution to ensure transferability). With UConn’s online summer courses, you’re attending classes at one of the nations top-ranked public institutions.

If you require any assistance registering for an online physics course or have questions please reach out to us using the Need Help button.

Content Area 1

Below is a sample of Content Area 1 courses that are being offered this year. To view all Content Area 1 courses offered this summer, please visit our Summer 2022 Course Listing and select CA1 – Arts & Humanities from the Content Area filter.”

Art Appreciation (ART 1000)

ART 1000

Introduction to the visual arts, past and present. The visual language of artists, historical and cultural significance of works of art. Intended primarily for students who are not art majors. CA 1.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: Not open to ART majors. RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses.
Grading Basis: Graded

Classical Mythology (CAMS 1103)

CAMS 1103

Origin, nature, and function of myth in the literature and art of Greece and Rome and the re-interpretation of classical myth in modern art forms. Taught in English. CA 1.

 

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: None.

Grading Basis: Graded

 

The City in the Western Tradition
(GEOG 1200/URBN 1200)

GEOG/URBN 1200

A broad discussion of the role and structure of the city in the western tradition from the Classical period to contemporary America. Special emphasis will be placed on the mechanisms by which cities and ideas about them have been diffused from one place to another and on the changing forces that have shaped the western city. CA 1.

Also offered as: URBN 1200

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses

Grading Basis: Graded

Poetry (ENGL 2401)

ENGL 2401

Includes important works from the major genres and historical periods since Beowulf. CA 1.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.
Grading Basis: Graded

Language and Mind (LING 1010)

LING 1010

Discussion of nature-nurture debate with specific reference to language acquisition. Pros and cons of Chomsky's Innateness Hypothesis. CA 1.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: None.
Grading Basis: Graded

 

Problems of Philosophy (PHIL 1101)

PHIL 1101

Topics may include skepticism, proofs of God, knowledge of the external world, induction, free-will, the problem of evil, miracles, liberty and equality. CA 1.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: No student may receive more than 6 credits for PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, 1107. RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses.
Grading Basis: Graded

Introduction to Political Theory (POLS 1002)

POLS 1002

Major themes of political theory such as justice, obligation, and equality, and their relevance to contemporary political concerns. CA 1.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses
Grading Basis: Graded

City and Community in Film (URBN 2400)

URBN 2400

Aesthetics, history, and contemporary relevance of American films that feature the urban, suburban, and/or small town landscape as a major "character" shaping plot and story. Films read closely as texts that make meaning through a range of tools, including narrative, mise-en-scene, editing, camera work, and genre conventions. CA 1.

Also offered as: AMST 2400
3.00 credits
Prerequisites: None.
Grading Basis: Graded

Content Area 2

Below is a sample of Content Area 2 courses that are being offered this year. To view all Content Area 2 courses offered this summer, please visit our Summer 2022 Course Listing and select CA2 – Communications from the Content Area filter.”

Principles of Applied and Resource Economics (ARE 1150)

ARE 1150

An introduction to microeconomic analysis with applications to food, nutrition, health, natural resources, and the environment. Topics include consumer and firm behavior, supply, demand, markets, and economic policy. CA 2.

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Not open for credit to students who have passed ECON 1201.

Grading Basis: Graded

The Process of Communication (COMM 1000)

COMM 1000

A study of modern communication theories and principles useful in understanding how people affect and are affected by others through communication. CA 2.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses
Grading Basis: Graded

Critical and Creative Thinking in the Movies (EPSY 1830)

EPSY 1830

Topics such as logical fallacies, influence, metacognition, problem solving, creative genius, personality, and motivation will be explored. Students will use readings and films to investigate the role and application of these topics on critical thinking and creativity. CA 2.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: None.
Grading Basis: Graded

Introduction to Geography (GEOG 1000)

GEOG 1000

Includes important works from the major genres and historical periods since Beowulf. CA 1.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.
Grading Basis: Graded

Close Relationships Across the Lifespan (HDFS 1060)

HDFS 1060

Theory and research on topics in the close relationship literature including attraction, relationship development and maintenance, friendship and social support, love, sexuality, intimacy, power, communication, conflict, dissolution and divorce, and bereavement. CA 2.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses
Grading Basis: Graded

Introduction to Human Rights (HRTS 1007)

HRTS 1007

Exploration of central human rights institutions, selected human rights themes and political controversies, and key political challenges of contemporary human rights advocacy. CA 2. CA 4-INT.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: None.
Grading Basis: Graded

 

Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 1001)

SOCI 1001

Modern society and its social organization, institutions, communities, groups, and social roles: the socialization of individuals, family, gender, race and ethnicity, religion, social class, crime and deviance, population, cities, political economy, and social change. CA 2.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: May not be taken out of sequence after passing SOCI 3203. RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses.
Grading Basis: Graded

Gender Representations in U.S. Popular Culture (WGSS 3253)

WGSS 3253

Forces in the U.S. that shape and reshape gender in popular culture. CA 2.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.
Grading Basis: Graded

Content Area 3

Below is a sample of Content Area 3 courses that are being offered this year. To view all Content Area 3 courses offered this summer, please visit our Summer 2022 Course Listing and select CA3 – Animal Science from the Content Area filter.”

The Science of Food (ANSC 1645)

ANSC 1645

An introductory level course for students interested in the application of science to food. Nutritional and functional attributes of various food constituents are discussed. Issues concerning food processing and food safety are covered. CA 3.

Also offered as: NUSC 1645
3.00 credits
Prerequisites: None.
Grading Basis: Graded

Earth's Dynamic Environment (Lecture) (ERTH 1051)

ERTH 1501

Origin and history of planet Earth, emphasizing how rock, air, water, and life interact at different scales to produce the earth's crust, landforms, life systems, natural resources, catastrophes, and climatic regimes. Provides a scientific context for human-induced global change. Students who complete both GSCI 1051 and 1052 may request that GSCI 1051 be converted to a CA 3 Laboratory course. CA 3. Formerly offered as GSCI 1051.

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Not open for credit to students who have passed GSCI 1010, 1050, 1055, or 1070.

Grading Basis: Graded

General Psychology I (PSYC 1100)

PSYC 1100

Basic principles that underlie mental processes and behavior; research methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, memory and language. Ordinarily this course should be taken in the fall semester. CA 3.

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: None.

Grading Basis: Graded

Fundamentals of Nutrition (NUSC 1165)

NUSC 1165

An introduction to the principles and concepts of nutrition with emphasis on the nature and function of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals and vitamins, and their application to the human organism. CA 3.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: May not be taken out of sequence after passing NUSC 3171, 3172, 3180, 3233, 3234, 4236 or 4250. RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses.
Grading Basis: Graded

Content Area 3 Lab Courses

View a Sample of Courses

Foundations of Biology (BIOL 1102)

BIOL 1102

Major biological principles with emphasis on their importance to humans and modern society; designed for non-science majors. CA 3-LAB.

4.00 credits
Prerequisites: Not open to students who have passed BIOL 1107, 1108 or 1110. Students may not receive more than 12 credits for courses in Biology at the 1000 level. RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses.
Grading Basis: Graded

Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1107)

BIOL 1107

Major biological principles with emphasis on their importance to humans and modern society; designed for non-science majors. CA 3-LAB.

4.00 credits
Prerequisites: Not open to students who have passed BIOL 1107, 1108 or 1110. Students may not receive more than 12 credits for courses in Biology at the 1000 level. RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses.
Grading Basis: Graded

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1108)

BIOL 1108

Designed to provide a foundation for more advanced courses in biology and related sciences. Topics covered include evolution and population genetics, plant physiology and diversity, animal diversity and behavior, and ecology. CA 3-LAB.

4.00 credits
Prerequisites: Students may not receive more than 12 credits for courses in BIOL at the 1000 level.
Grading Basis: Graded

Chemical Principles and Applications (CHEM 1122)

CHEM 1122

Brief but comprehensive survey of important chemical theories and applications of chemistry. Preparation for one-semester courses in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Atomic structures, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, and theories of solutions. Does not fulfill the two-semester general chemistry requirement for majors in biology, chemistry, pharmacy, physics and agriculture and natural resources. Does not satisfy the admission requirements of medical and dental schools. CA 3-LAB.

4.00 credits
Prerequisites: Not open to students who have passed CHEM 1124. May not be taken out of sequence after passing CHEM 1127Q or 1137Q or 1147Q.
Grading Basis: Graded

Content Area 4

Below is a sample of Content Area 4 courses that are being offered this year. To view all Content Area 4 courses offered this summer, please visit our Summer 2022 Course Listing and select CA4 – Psychology from the Content Area filter.”

African-American Women Playwrights, 1900 to the present (AFRA 3132)

AFRA 3132

African American women's playwriting in relationship to social, historical, and political contexts. CA 1. CA 4.

Also offered as: DRAM 3132

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: AFRA/DRAM 3131.

Grading Basis: Graded

Contemporary Social Issues in Sport (EDLR 2001)

EDLR 2001

Socio-cultural, economic, political, and other related issues in sport. Sport as a social institution, the impact of sport in American culture, and the impact of American culture on sport. Sport at the youth, intercollegiate, professional, and international levels; how sport at these levels is experienced differently by individuals, communities, organizations, and society. Issues in sport relative to gender, race (ethnicity), differing physical and intellectual ability, sexual identity, and gender identity. CA 4.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: None.
Grading Basis: Graded

Diversity Issues in Human Development and Family Sciences (HDFS 2001)

HDFS 2001

Critical issues in diversity and multiculturalism in human development, family relations, and professional practice. CA 4.

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Open to sophomores or higher. Recommended preparation: HDFS 1070.

Grading Basis: Graded

Introduction to Multicultural Psychology (PSYC 2101)

PSYC 2101

General introduction to cross-cultural and multicultural issues and the role psychology has played in understanding the experiences of diverse groups. CA 4.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: PSYC 1100; PSYC 1101 or 1103.
Grading Basis: Graded

Content Area 4 Courses

View a Sample of Courses

Italy's Mediterranean Food and Our Health (AH 2330)

AH 2330

Production and processing of the characteristic foods of Italy. Summary of the Italian Mediterranean diet: definitions, culture, history, food consumption patterns, nutrient composition and potential health benefits. Emphasis on the difference in diet between Italians and Americans in relation to the health differences between the two populations. May not be counted toward the Allied Health Sciences major's group A or science elective requirements. CA 4-INT.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: None.
Grading Basis: Graded

Irish Literature in English since 1939 (ENGL 3122)

ENGL 3122

Fiction, drama, and poetry by such writers as Beckett, O'Brien, Friel, Heaney, Doyle, Carr, McCabe, Toibin, and McDonagh. CA 4-INT.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.
Grading Basis: Graded

Food, Culture and Society (NUSC 1167)

NUSC 1167

Social, cultural, and economic factors affecting food intake and nutritional status. Includes contemporary topics such as world food problems, hunger in the United States, dieting and eating disorders, health foods and vegetarianism. CA 4-INT.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: RHAG students cannot take more than 22 credits of 1000 level courses
Grading Basis: Graded

"E" Environmental Courses

Below is a sample of Environmental courses that are being offered this year. To view all "E" courses offered this summer, please visit our Summer 2022 Course Listing and select "E" from the Content Area filter.”

Environmental Health (AH 3175E)

AH 3175E

The environmental health consequences of exposure to toxic chemicals, food contaminants and radiation. Basic principles of toxicology and topics such as cancer, occupational hazards, radiation, genetic biomonitoring, risk assessment techniques, risk/benefit analysis, social/legal aspects of regulating toxic chemicals, and other related topics.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: BIOL 1102 or higher; CHEM 1122 or higher; open to Allied Health Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies and Engineering majors, others with instructor consent; open to juniors or higher. Recommended preparation: a course in animal anatomy and physiology.
Grading Basis: Graded

Environmental and Resource Policy (ARE 2434E)

ARE 2434E

Emergence of environmental policies from the local, legal, and regulatory angles. Formalization and structure of environmental policy with a focus on the hurdles, design, and implementation of policy, particularly air and water policy. Suitable for all majors.

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: None.

Grading Basis: Graded

Environmental Economics (ECON 3466E)

ECON 3466E

Application of economic reasoning to environmental issues. Topics include air and water pollution and the management of natural resources; market failure and environmental regulation; market-based mechanisms; cost-benefit analysis, environmental valuation, and program evaluation; environmental justice from an economic perspective.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: ECON 2201 or 2211Q
Grading Basis: Graded

General Ecology (EEB 2244E)

EEB 2244E

Concepts from aqueous chemistry, biology, and physics applied in a quantitative manner to environmental problems and solutions. Mass and energy balances, chemical reaction engineering. Quantitative and fundamental description of water and air pollution problems. Environmental regulations and policy, pollution prevention, risk assessment. Written and oral reports.

Also offered as: CE 2310E
3.00 credits
Prerequisites: CHEM 1128 or 1148
Grading Basis: Graded

Environmental Engineering Fundamentals (ENVE 2310E)

ENVE 2310E

Fundamental ecological dynamics of communities, populations, and ecosystems, including how humans impact the health and well-being of the natural world, the concept of ecosystem services, and the synergy between conservation of the biota and sustainability. Emphasis in discussion sections is on reading primary literature, problem-solving, scientific method, and sampling techniques.

4.00 credits
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108
Grading Basis: Graded

Introduction to Water Resources (NRE 2215E)

NRE 2215E

Introduction to surface and ground water resource assessment, development and management. Integration of scientific, legal, environmental and human factors that enter into developing and maintaining sustainable water resources. Examines current and future plight of water shortages and water quality issues here and abroad. Three class periods and two field trips (two virtual field trips if taken online).

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: Open to sophomores or higher. Recommended preparation: NRE 1000 and GSCI 1050.
Grading Basis: Graded

Environmental Law (NRE 3245E)

NRE 3245E

An overview of environmental law including the common law principles of nuisance, negligence, and trespass. Students will become acquainted with legal research techniques; emphasis will be on federal, state, and municipal programs addressing clear air, clean water, hazardous waste, inland wetlands, coastal zone management, and prime agricultural farm land and aquifer protection.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: Open only to juniors or higher.
Grading Basis: Graded

"Q" Quantitative Courses

Below is a sample of "Q" Quantitative Courses that are being offered this year. To view all "Q" courses offered this summer, please visit our Summer 2022 Course Listing and select "Q" from the Content Area filter.”

Research Methods in Communication (COMM 2000Q)

COMM 2000Q (SS1)

The scientific approach as it specifically applies to communication. Formerly offered as COMM 3000Q.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: COMM 1000. Recommended preparation: MATH 1011Q or equivalent
Grading Basis: Graded

Research Methods in Communication (COMM 2000Q)

Introduction to Statistics I (STAT 1000Q)

STAT 1000Q

A standard approach to statistical analysis primarily for students of business and economics; elementary probability, sampling distributions, normal theory estimation and hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, exploratory data analysis. Learning to do statistical analysis on a personal computer is an integral part of the course.

4.00 credits
Prerequisites: Students can receive no more than four credits from STAT 1000Q and 1100Q. Students who have passed a 2000-level or above STAT course or who are taking such a course concurrently cannot take 1000-level STAT courses.
Grading Basis: Graded

Elementary Concepts of Statistics (STAT 1100Q)

STAT 1100Q

Standard and nonparametric approaches to statistical analysis; exploratory data analysis, elementary probability, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, one- and two-sample procedures, regression and correlation. Learning to do statistical analysis on a personal computer is an integral part of the course.

4.00 credits
Prerequisites: Students can receive no more than four credits from STAT 1000Q and 1100Q. Students who have passed a 2000-level or above STAT course or who are taking such a course concurrently cannot take 1000-level STAT courses.
Grading Basis: Graded

Introduction to Statistics II (STAT 2215Q)

STAT 2215Q

Analysis of variance, multiple regression, chi-square tests, and non-parametric procedures.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: STAT 1000 or STAT 1100 .
Grading Basis: Graded

Statistical Methods (STAT 3025Q)

STAT 3025Q

Straight-line regression, multiple regression, regression diagnostics, transformations, dummy variables, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, stepwise regression.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: STAT 2215 or 3025 or instructor consent. Credit may not be received for both STAT 3115 and 5315.
Grading Basis: Graded

"W" Writing Courses

Below is a sample of "W" Writing Courses that are being offered this year. To view all "W" courses offered this summer, please visit our Summer 2022 Course Listing and select "W" from the Content Area filter.”

Mind, Body, Health (EPSY 1450W)

ESPY 1450W

The role of the mind and its effects on subjective well-being (e.g., happiness, stress, depression, anxiety) and the physical body. The past history and current literature supporting the mind-body connection, assessment, and intervention. Implications for understanding mind body health relative to quality of life. CA 2.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.
Grading Basis: Graded

Writing for Allied Health Research (AH 4240W)

AH 4240W

Develop scientific writing skills through completing a scientific research proposal.

1.00 credits
Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; a course in statistics; open to juniors or higher. open only to Allied Health Sciences majors, others with consent of instructor. Corequisite: AH 4239. Not open to students who have passed AH 4241W.
Grading Basis: Graded

Scientific Writing in Animal Food Products (ANSC 3344W)

ANSC 3344W

Writing intensive class integrated with course content in ANSC 3323 Animal Embryology and Embryo Biotechnology.

1.00 credits
Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher. Corequisite: ANSC 3323.
Grading Basis: Graded

Media Literacy and Criticism (COMM 3310W)

COMM 3310W

History, analysis and evaluation of technique, content and aesthetic effect of media messages. Cultural, political, economic, and institutional factors that help define the grammar of popular mass media content; social scientific perspectives addressing how audiences learn to comprehend media content including efforts to promote media literacy. Formerly offered as COMM 2310W.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: COMM 2300 or 2600; ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.
Grading Basis: Graded

American Utopias and Dystopias (ENGL 2276W)

ENGL 2276W

Interdisciplinary approaches to American utopian and dystopian literature of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. CA 1.

Also offered as: AMST 2276W

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Grading Basis: Graded

Research Methods in Human Development and Family Sciences (HDFS 2004W)

HDFS 2004W

Overview of research methods with emphasis on the social context in which research occurs and is used, and strengths and limitations of social science research methods. Includes topics such as hypothesis formation, measurement of social variables, research ethics, data collection techniques, and interpreting results.

4.00 credits
Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; HDFS 1070, which may be taken concurrently; open only to HDFS majors, sophomores or higher. May not be taken out of sequence after passing HDFS 3092, 4004, or 4007.
Grading Basis: Graded

Microbiology and the Media (MCB 3844W)

MCB 3844W

Analysis and comparison of how contemporary microbiological topics such as food-borne diseases and influenza outbreaks are represented in the scientific literature and in popular media.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; at least two MCB courses at the 2000 level or above; open only to Molecular and Cell Biology and Biological Sciences majors; others by permission.
Grading Basis: Graded

Public Communication of Physiology and Neurobiology (PNB 3120W)

PNB 3120W

Strategies for effective public communication of science, focusing on accessibly conveying physiological concepts, and considering the role of life scientists as public communicators. Student work may include storytelling, blogging, data visualization, and videography.

3.00 credits
Prerequisites: One 2000-level course in PNB; ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open only to Physiology and Neurobiology majors.
Grading Basis: Graded

Exploring Your Community (URBN 1300W)

URBN 1300W

Various aspects of urban and community life emphasizing the interplay of social justice, diversity, individual and social well being. Explores theories, concepts, and methods in community studies. May contain a service learning component. CA 2. CA 4.

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Grading Basis: Graded