History

Cool May online course – Watch (French) Movies: Get credit!

Still from Un Chien Andalou (1929)
From Un Chien Andalou (1929)

FREN 1171. French Cinema

Watch films and earn credit? Sound too good to be true?  But it’s not!  Watch a series of French films, from early French comedy to surrealist films, New Wave and the hip filmmakers of the 1990s and beyond.  This course will introduce you to film history, analysis and interpretation.

This course fulfills GenEd CA 1 and CA 4-INT. (3 credits).

Three credits. Online. Readings, viewings and lectures in English. May not be used to meet the foreign language requirement.

Cool Summer Courses in Sociology – Latinos & Social Movements

Check out these two cool May Term courses in sociology!

  • LLAS/SOCI 3525: Latino Sociology
  • SOCI 3821: Social Movements
Graffiti on L.A. wall by ManOne
“They Claim I’m a Criminal” by Man One in Los Angeles, 2010

LLAS/SOCI  3525: LATINO SOCIOLOGY

In 2001 Latinos became the largest minority group in the United States, projected to reach 132.8 million in 2050. The demographic significance of Latinos has led politicians, policy-makers, and academics to debate the future of this population. The purpose of this course is to help you think critically about the role that Latinos play in U.S. society and their diverse experiences. I will provide you with a set of ideas, concepts and ideas to analyze the contemporary and historical experiences of Latinos. In this course, we will primarily use sociological texts to 1) make sense of the history of Chicano and Puerto Rican Movements and the discipline of Latino Studies, 2) explore the diverse migration experiences of Latinos, and 3) study the patterns of incorporation that Latinos face in the United States.

March for civil rights in Washington DC 1963
Crowd in front of Lincoln Memorial on day of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, August 28, 1963 (New York Times).

SOCIOLOGY 3821: SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the sociological study of social movements. By analyzing specific movements, you will gain a deeper understanding of the dynamics that shape both current and historical social movements. After you have taken this course you will be able to answer the following questions:  why do certain movements emerge at particular times? What motivates people to join them? What tactics and strategies do activists choose and why? We will look at movements for global justice, anti-racism and racism, immigrant rights, and many more.

LLAS/SOCI  3525: Latino Sociology.  May Term (M-F 9:00-11:30 a.m.)

SOCI 3821: Social Movements. May Term (M-F 1:00-4:00 p.m.)